Autism Awareness Day| Direct Action is Better

Autism Awareness Day at the Opera

Autism Day at the Opera

April is Autism Awareness month. The United Nations General Assembly even designates a World Autism Awareness Day.

World Autism Awareness | Gone Amuck

For the last week, I’ve been following the comment streams on Twitter (#Autism, #ASD, #WAAD…) and other social media outlets like Facebook… and I wonder if the whole world is nuts.

My son is 43, has autism and we are desperate for help. So I appreciate the need for autism awareness and DIRECT ACTION.

For autism awareness day, I’ve learned some people are buying blue mascara and lipstick to spread “awareness about autism.”

Others are using April 2nd as a “retail therapy” day to buy new clothes in blue.

How will Autism Awareness Day impact the lives of people with autism and their families?

For the life of me I can’t imagine why blue lights at the Sydney Opera House, The White House, Empire State Building or the house next door will change a thing–except for the blue light bulb retailer.

Put Time and Money where your Mouth is

It makes more sense to me, that the expense of buying blue lights, hiring a team of workers to install and operate those lights for one day–is just dumb and a waste of opportunity.

Using those same dollars, the Opera House could invite families or parents to an evening of the opera. Sure, the Sydney Opera House might not get the same press, but the impact would be direct and measurable. Real families would have the treasured opportunity for a night of respite.

I understand the White House is meeting with some advocates for autism which is an action step–much more useful in my opinion to a blue illusion.

The Empire State Building–well, there were those romance flicks with the hearts on Valentine’s Day, but really?

Action–not Hype

Now good people and advocates are working hard for all this autism awareness, and I know my skepticism sounds like sour grapes or something mean spirited.

I’m just tired of being used and being the victims of charity.

Past Experiences with the Charity Model and hype

One time our family was on a trip to the Smokey Mountains. My husband Tom, an avid golfer, passed a golf course which had a huge sign over the gate “Welcome Special Olympics.”

Tom went to the front desk and asked if Aaron, our son with the label of autism, could ride in the golf cart as he played golf.

The desk clerk looked confused. Tom said Aaron would be sitting next to him and would not even be on the course. He also told him Aaron has accompanied him on other golf courses and it worked out fine.

As the clerk continued to stammer around–Tom pointed to the “Welcome Special Olympics” sign.

The young man shook his head,

“Tomorrow, our Special Olympic fundraiser is for radio/TV personalities, the Governor and all kinds of influential people coming to play golf. NOT–those kind (pointing at Aaron). This is our public relations and publicity event for the year. It isn’t for them. We don’t allow them on the course.”

Real People–Not Causes

At a time when getting services for children and adults with autism and their families is desperate, my hope for tomorrow is that people will spend a couple minutes with actual people who have the label of autism.

If you want to dress up in blue from head to toe, with blue eye shadow and lips, more power to you. But somewhere in the day, actually touch a real person. Make a difference in an actual life.

Make the Autism Awareness Day, more than a media moment.

Take the opportunity to begin change–one on one.

Keep Climbing: Onward and Upward
All my best,


Mary

What do you think?

Are you wearing Blue? Are you going to spend a couple minutes with an actual person who has the label of autism?

Chocolate Covered Fun for All Ages and Abilities

Chocolate Covered Strawberries

Mouth watering?

Don’t these chocolate covered strawberries look delicious?

For the Holidays, or any day, what about making chocolate covered treats or gifts for the people you love?

Chocolate Covered Fun for ALL AGES and Abilities

Parents, Special Education Teachers, Directors of Day Programs and Senior Centers: Everyone is looking for activities that are fun, age-appropriate, and allow people with all ability levels to participate.

Taking your favorite snack for a chocolate dip may be the answer.
The costs will vary according to the ingredients, but pretzels and marshmallows are cheap. Of course if you want to go gourmet, hey, yum.

Partial Participation

Chocolate Covered Strawberries
Creative Commons License photo credit: mbaylor

“Partial Participation is Better than Exclusion from an Activity” *

Even if the recipe says, “Easy” that doesn’t mean every person can do every part of the activity.

For instance, Aaron, my son with the label of autism, wouldn’t be able to set the timer on the microwave–but he can certainly dip the pretzel in the chocolate sauce and choose the kind of sprinkles for the decoration.

Aaron can’t read the recipe with words, but he could follow the directions with pictures and though he can’t drive to the grocery, he can partially participate by picking out the pretzels and chocolate.

When Aaron was in school and had a speech therapist, one of his goals was identifying pictures of grocery items and finding the item in the grocery aisle. When he had a physical therapist, one of his IEP goals was pushing the grocery cart without hitting anyone in the grocery store. (Not a pretend grocery store in the classroom.) When he had an occupational therapist, one of his goals was to hand the grocery clerk the money to purchase the items and put the money back in his pocket. Aaron successfully learned these skills and practiced them every week in his functional community-based program and … every time our family went into the community grocery store.

There are lots of things Aaron can do to partially participate in every activity.

When Aaron is part of the group when he does purposeful, functional activities, he develops self-esteem, he is a doer. He is not just a passive observer. If he is treated as a baby, or as someone who cannot do anything but watch, then he loses his skills and his self-esteem. The people who think they are being nice and helpful to him, are not–they are actually causing him to lose skills/self-esteem.

This is a functional activity because if Aaron doesn’t go to the grocery to get the supplies someone else will have to do it.

If Aaron is actively involved in the shopping, the decorating, and gives the chocolate covered pretzels as a gift HE MADE–then this activity becomes much more than an easy activity to fill the day. It can become a learning and social enhancing experience. When he gives Grandma a package of pretzels he made, it is a joyful celebration for everyone. You should see his smile 🙂

*Dr. Lou Brown, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Be Creative: Lots of Ideas

heart-crispies
Creative Commons License

Dip White or Dark Chocolate Ideas:

Dried Fruit (apricots, raisons…)
Fresh Fruit (strawberries, cherries with stems, apples (whole or slices)…)
Pretzel Rods of any size
Marshmallows
Cookies
Graham Crackers
Candy Canes
Rice Krispie Treats

How to Make Chocolate Covered Pretzels:

Age-Appropriate Activity

Activity for All Ages and Abilities

Things You Might Need:

Microwave-safe glass or measuring cups

Cooking spray

Bags white and dark chips (12 oz.)

Spoon

Pot Holders

Cookie Sheet

Wax paper

Bag of pretzel rods (12 oz.) or other food

Small candies or sprinkles

You Tube Video Demonstration

Task Analysis or Recipe

Chocolate-Covered Pretzels with Sprinkles

Recipe courtesy Paula Deen for Food Network Magazine
Prep Time: 20 min, Inactive Prep Time: 24 hr 0 min
Cook Time: 2 min; Level: Easy
Serves: 24 pretzels

Ingredients:
• 1 12-ounce package milk chocolate chips
• 1 12-ounce package white chocolate chips
• 24 large pretzel rods
• Assorted holiday sprinkles

Directions:
Place the milk chocolate chips in a microwave-safe bowl and the white chocolate chips in another. Microwave one bowl on high for 1 minute. Remove and stir with a rubber spatula. (The chips should melt while you are stirring, but if they don’t, you can continue to microwave for 15 more seconds, and then stir again.) Wash and dry the spatula. Microwave the other bowl on high for 1 minute, and stir until the chocolate is melted.

Dip one pretzel rod into the milk chocolate; use a spoon or butter knife to spread the chocolate about halfway up the rod. Twist the rod to let the excess chocolate drip off. Hold the rod over a piece of wax paper and shake sprinkles on all sides. Place the pretzel on another piece of wax paper to dry. Coat another pretzel with white chocolate and sprinkles. Repeat until you’ve coated all the pretzels, half with milk chocolate, half with white chocolate, and let dry completely, about 24 hours. (Cover any remaining chocolate with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator.)

Copyright 2011 Television Food Network G.P. http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/paula-deen/chocolate-covered-pretzels-with-sprinkles-recipe2/index.html
All Rights Reserved

Gifts and Favors, Holiday Variations

President’s Day, Halloween, Easter, 4th of July, Christmas Variations

All American Holiday

Gifts and Favors

Stick Pretzels

Paula Deen’s Christmas Pretzels

Halloween chocolate covered pretzels

Comments:

Does it make sense that an activity as simple as making a chocolate covered pretzel can be a learning and self-esteem project? Can teachers, parents and directors of day programs make this more? Can they blow the opportunity?

Have you any ideas on this or other projects?

Keep Climbing: Onward and Upward

All my best,
Mary

Other Related Articles:

It’s a Jungle Out There| Inclusion in the Grocery Store

Language of the Heart| Heartaches and Heartsongs

Busy vs. Bored| Life Space Analysis for People with Disabilities

The Animal School| Differentiated Instruction

Test Questions| Inclusion or Segregation?

Teachers| Segregation or Inclusion

Happy Ever Afters| One For The Money

Norm Kunc: What’s Your Credo?

Socially Constructed Attitudes| What do you see?

follow the arrow from A-Z

What do you see?

Every day businesses and community groups try to influence us with logos and symbols.

Did you ever look close–really close–at some of these logos? Sometimes there are hidden messages.

How many times have you seen the Amazon logo?

Have you ever noticed the A-Z arrow? I didn’t.

Could this be a visual cue saying, “You can purchase everything from A to Z”? Not just books.

Business logos and commercials dominate the social media and we often take them for granted. But no doubt about it, they influence our attitudes.

Baskin Robbins

See the 31 flavors?

What’s your first impression?

What’s your second impression?

Baskin Robbins’ logo reminds us they have 31 different flavors of ice cream—can’t you just taste the butter pecan and chocolate chip?

Are you surprised the number 31 is right there in front of you?

Did you notice?

Tostitos

See 2 people sharing a tostito?

Mexican flag colors, right.

But there is a whole scene right in the middle of the logo.

Do you see two people?

They are sharing chips and between them is a table with a cup of salsa.

Now that you are aware, will you notice the embedded image on every Tostito bag of chips?

Will you tell your friends?

Your actions are helping to socially construct the meaning of their logo, the meaning of Tostito’s brand–Friend to friend.

Tour de France

See the bike? Guy in yellow Tshirt?

The most famous bike race in the world, The Tour de France logo shows an action shot of a man on a bike.

See it? The R is a man bent over the yellow wheel of a bike.

What emotions do you feel?

Bet the marketing company spent hours researching the color of the t-shirt including study groups on whether the best color was blue, red or yellow.

Perhaps this ad was donated or created by a student…or a giant ad company on Fifth Avenue.

Wolf Wolfensburger spent years teaching us to be thoughtful about the images, logos and symbols we use when we market our agencies and companies that worked with people with disabilities.

He spoke of the social construction of knowledge–we are what others say we are:

“Impairment is a normal part of life. Disability is not. That is caused by our attitudes towards people who have impairments. It’s about time we accepted that wholeheartedly. Doing so is good for people who are disabled, for community and for the planet.”

Final Question: What do you see?

What do you see?

(Martha Perske, artist)

As parents and caregivers of adults with disabilities, every day we send out messages to the world.

Our neighbors, our relatives, our children and our community are watching and learning. They are socially constructing what they see based on their experiences.

Are we spreading the message that people with disabilities over 18 years old are adults—NOT children?

Are we marketing our services in unhuman images of angels, devils, elves, giants in our company names and logos?

Does a group of people with autism walking in a store blend in, or do they draw attention to themselves?

Are adults with disabilities seen as capable employees, volunteers, contributing citizens?

Or do community members see them as needy–asking for charity, or pity?

Are we promoting inclusion and normalization?

Are we teaching others what they see? how to understand?

If this was a business, what would our logo look like and what would be the embedded message?

How are we socially constructing our environment, our world?

Your Turn:

Please share your ideas and thoughts. What message do we send on TV? in the community? What message in our personal life? What do you wish would happen?

Keep Climbing: Onward and Upward

All my best,

Mary

Related Posts:

What is normalization?

Perske| Hope for the Families

The Race toward Inclusion| Do you see it?

Language of the Heart| Heartaches and Heartsongs

Big Heart of Art - 1000 Visual Mashups
Creative Commons License photo credit: qthomasbower

In the post: Caring Community| People First Language we talked about the power of labels, negative stereotypes and the paradigm shift of looking at all people as PEOPLE First!

Today, on Valentine’s Day, I am asking you to think about how you use words:

Do my words cause Heartaches?
Do my words cause Heartsongs?

What are you doing?

WHAT are you doing?

What ARE you doing?

What are YOU doing?

WHAT THE HELL ARE YOU DOING!!!!

The same words can be said in anger or with gentle concern.
The speaker, the listener, the context of the communication, as well as the intent all make a difference.

Parents, Teachers, Coworkers, Friends, Enemies… We have all been misunderstood and misinterpreted. We have all wished we could swallow what came out of our mouths–take back our words. We have all been both aggressors and victims and have given heartaches as well as heartsongs.

HEARTACHES: “What’s that mess on your shirt?”
HEARTSONGS: “I see you have paint on your shirt.”
————————————————————-

HEARTACHES: “NO!”
HEARTSONGS: “Let’s talk about this before you decide.”
————————————————————

HEARTACHES: “Get over here right now!”
HEARTSONGS: “I need you with me.”
————————————————————-

HEARTACHES: “I told you so.”
HEARTSONGS: “That was harder than you thought.”
—————————————————————

In the comment section, let’s share some ideas on how you could make each of the following examples into either a heartache, or a heartsong?

Scenarios: Heartaches or Heartsongs.

1. Sara is eating breakfast. The bus is coming in 5 minutes. She spills her juice while reaching for the cereal.

What could you say that would cause a heartache?

What could you say that would cause a heartsong?

2. Ken wants to help his friend wash the car. He accidentally squirts him with the hose.

What could you say that could cause a heartache?

What could you say that could cause a heartsong?

3. Emily comes home from work. When asked about her day, she begins to cry and says, “Jim doesn’t like me.”

What could you say that could cause a heartache?

What could you say that could cause a heartsong?

By speaking with your heart, you may be able to bring out the very best in people. Give them a chance to talk. Listen patiently.

And of course, there is always the quote: “I know that you believe you understand what you think I said, but I’m not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.” But we’ll save that for another post.

I’m wishing you a day filled with heartsongs. May you have many opportunities to give them and to receive them. Spread the love.

Keep Climbing: Onward and Upward
All my love,


Mary

Comments:

Do you have any examples of heartaches, heartsongs?
Heartaches turned into heartsongs?
Use the examples above, or share some from your own experiences.

Adapted from Project Prepare, Ohio (1995)